Washington College Creates New Role of Associate Dean for International Education; Japan Scholar Andrew Oros Begins Three-Year Term

Washington College
September 28, 2017 – CHESTERTOWN, MD

Washington College Provost Patrice DiQuinzio has appointed Andrew Oros, professor of political science and international studies, to a new position of Associate Dean for International Education. In this role, Oros will help coordinate and develop strategy for the growth in international education initiatives at the College, as well as enhance the experience of international students at Washington College and that of domestic students traveling abroad.

Andrew Oros - Contributed Photo

Dr. Andrew Oros – Contributed Photo

“To provide the best support possible to both our international students on campus and all of our students who want to study abroad, we have created the position Associate Dean for International Education, to be filled by a faculty member,” DiQuinzio says. “I’m delighted that Dr. Andrew Oros has accepted this position. Andrew has an international reputation as a scholar, many contacts in international politics and related fields around the world, and the leadership skills we need to continue and expand on the great work that our Global Education staff accomplishes.”

Oros has taught at Washington College since 2002 and accepted the three-year term for the new position in September. He has directed the inter-disciplinary international studies major since 2011, worked closely with students and the Global Education Office on study abroad and other international opportunities, and advised dozens of exchange and matriculated international students. He has also served on and chaired the College’s standing committee on international education. Earlier this year Oros was promoted to professor of political science and international studies, and as associate dean he will continue to teach one course per semester in his home department.

The total number of matriculated (non-exchange) international students at the College has grown from 28 to 131 in the past five years. Together with roughly 30 visiting international exchange students each year from Washington College’s 29 partner institutions around the world, the student body at Washington College is approximately 10 percent international.

This fall’s incoming class includes 15 matriculating international students from three countries and 18 visiting exchange students from eight countries. Students from China constitute the largest single group of international students, 70 percent. Oros will work with

Sibel Ahi, Assistant Director of the Global Education Office (GEO) and herself once an international student in the United States, who leads GEO’s efforts to enhance the international student experience at Washington College.

Washington College domestic students also are increasingly involved in learning abroad. In addition to semester-long exchange opportunities with the College’s 29 partner institutions around the world, a growing number of faculty are leading students on short-term abroad programs over the summer and winter breaks. In the past five years, several new programs have been developed, including travels focused on plant biology in Nicaragua, ethno-musicology in Cuba, and programs to Greece, Israel, and India. These new programs supplement longstanding summer break programs such as the Kiplin Hall Program in the UK’s Lake District to gain insights on English literature, and the Summer Teaching Experience in Tanzania. In the last academic year alone, 128 students participated in short-term abroad programs and 39 in semester-long exchange programs.

“I look forward to working with Dr. Oros on strategic issues such as a comprehensive review and assessment of our current study abroad offerings, improving career and grad school advising for international students, and strengthening alumni connections with international graduates and graduates living and working outside of the U.S.,” DiQuinzio says.

Oros’s scholarly work on Japan, most recently his new book, Japan’s Security Renaissance: New Policies and Politics for the 21st Century (Columbia University Press), has garnered international attention. This spring and summer alone he has lectured on or spoken with experts about Japan and East Asia security issues in Manila, Hanoi, Berlin, Stockholm, Leiden, Paris, Copenhagen, Tokyo, Perth, Canberra and Sydney. Insights from his research have been quoted in the New York Times, Washington Post, and other media globally.

This entry was posted in Announcements, Education, Washington College. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply